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SMF 2.1 Beta 3 Released

Started by Colin, May 31, 2017, 09:21:59 PM

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Aleksi "Lex" Kilpinen

Quote from: Bigguy on December 17, 2018, 08:00:12 PM
It's close. Of course this could change in a minute or two as well, lol. For now though the milestones look good:
https://github.com/SimpleMachines/SMF2.1/milestones

Yup, they look good. :) Nice to see that.
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landyvlad

Coolio!  Nice Christmas present maybe.
Please do not PM, IM or Email me with questions on astrophysics or theology.  You will get better and faster responses by asking homeless people in the street. Thank you.

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Sesquipedalian

Quote from: landyvlad on December 21, 2018, 12:33:40 AM
Coolio!  Nice Christmas present maybe.

* Sesquipedalian points at signature.
I promise you nothing.


Sesqu... Sesqui... what?
Sesquipedalian, the best word in the English language.

SugarD-x

Quote from: Sesquipedalian on December 21, 2018, 04:02:12 PM
Quote from: landyvlad on December 21, 2018, 12:33:40 AM
Coolio!  Nice Christmas present maybe.

* Sesquipedalian points at signature.
Conspiracy confirmed!

In all seriousness though, I noticed that the issues list for RC1 is completed. Is there a final to-do list publicized anywhere of what is left still before that version is released, or is that all in-house? Just asking simply out of curiosity.

Bigguy

Checking that the list of things to be done for that version is actually completed and there are as few bugs as possible. Changing the version in the files and maybe a few more checks here and there. I would guess. This is just what I think but who knows what the Devs will do before releasing.

SugarD-x

Quote from: Bigguy on December 21, 2018, 10:10:02 PM
Checking that the list of things to be done for that version is actually completed and there are as few bugs as possible. Changing the version in the files and maybe a few more checks here and there. I would guess. This is just what I think but who knows what the Devs will do before releasing.
I figured that was probably the case too. The curiosity is getting to me, though!

LiroyvH

December 22, 2018, 09:49:08 AM #246 Last Edit: December 22, 2018, 09:59:55 AM by CoreISP
When a version is (close to) being ready for release, there's several things we do in a release process.
Over the years the policy has changed to be a bit more rigorous as we had a couple of releases that had mistakes.
Admittedly, sometimes sloppy mistakes that could have been prevented by taking more time testing the packages - which we acknowledged and promised to do better.

In general when a release is imminent: all kinds of tests start happening. A few examples are checking if the packages build OK on the server, checking if language packs are generated (properly) and of course packages are created for internal use with what we think will become the release. This package is distributed to the team and a couple of member groups so that the installation, upgrade and patches (if applicable) can be tested for errors; both during install as issues that come up (shortly after) installing it. If errors occur that are actually caused by our code, they are fixed and an updated package is created to test it again. If there are no issues, we proceed. So when we're happy: fireworks start, hymns are sung, the servers shake in terror and beg the sysadmins to save them for what is about to come - and the release is actually made to the public. :) There's a lot more stuff/testing that is being done (by various teams, not just devs!), but this is one of the most fundamental examples about what's going on behind the scenes during a planned release of a new version. :)

This way we try to ensure, even for beta/RC releases, there are no (significant) issues with installing/upgrading.
So there's quite a lot happening in the background for each release and there's a good amount of testing taking place. :)
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Bigguy

Nice to hear what is actually going on. Very cool and sounds like a lot of work.

* Bigguy tip toes away as not to disturb anyone working.....please no shouting here right now, people are concentrating, lol.

SugarD-x

Quote from: CoreISP on December 22, 2018, 09:49:08 AM
When a version is (close to) being ready for release, there's several things we do in a release process.
Over the years the policy has changed to be a bit more rigorous as we had a couple of releases that had mistakes.
Admittedly, sometimes sloppy mistakes that could have been prevented by taking more time testing the packages - which we acknowledged and promised to do better.

In general when a release is imminent: all kinds of tests start happening. A few examples are checking if the packages build OK on the server, checking if language packs are generated (properly) and of course packages are created for internal use with what we think will become the release. This package is distributed to the team and a couple of member groups so that the installation, upgrade and patches (if applicable) can be tested for errors; both during install as issues that come up (shortly after) installing it. If errors occur that are actually caused by our code, they are fixed and an updated package is created to test it again. If there are no issues, we proceed. So when we're happy: fireworks start, hymns are sung, the servers shake in terror and beg the sysadmins to save them for what is about to come - and the release is actually made to the public. :) There's a lot more stuff/testing that is being done (by various teams, not just devs!), but this is one of the most fundamental examples about what's going on behind the scenes during a planned release of a new version. :)

This way we try to ensure, even for beta/RC releases, there are no (significant) issues with installing/upgrading.
So there's quite a lot happening in the background for each release and there's a good amount of testing taking place. :)
I appreciate the informative response. That was exactly what I was looking for! ;D

Sesquipedalian

Just to be clear, folks, CoreISP's post merely describes in general the processes involved in creating a release. For anyone trying to read between the lines, the anticipated release date of RC1 in particular remains what it has always been: when it's ready. ;)
I promise you nothing.


Sesqu... Sesqui... what?
Sesquipedalian, the best word in the English language.

Replikacep

December 24, 2018, 03:02:52 AM #250 Last Edit: December 24, 2018, 03:17:52 AM by Replikacep
Quote from: Sesquipedalian on December 23, 2018, 02:28:16 AM
Just to be clear, folks, CoreISP's post merely describes in general the processes involved in creating a release. For anyone trying to read between the lines, the anticipated release date of RC1 in particular remains what it has always been: when it's ready. ;)

rc 1 seems to be ready at the beginning of the year


Thanks to everyone who works, a very solid infrastructure has emerged.



Bigguy

That's not what that says. The part of that paragraph that says it'll be ready is this:

Quotethe anticipated release date of RC1 in particular remains what it has always been: when it's ready. ;)

SugarD-x

Quote from: Sesquipedalian on December 23, 2018, 02:28:16 AM
Just to be clear, folks, CoreISP's post merely describes in general the processes involved in creating a release. For anyone trying to read between the lines, the anticipated release date of RC1 in particular remains what it has always been: when it's ready. ;)
Completely understandable. I was just curious on what was left in terms of the general work. Now that all of the issues for RC1 have been "resolved", there's nothing left in public view to see how things are progressing for that particular version. I guess you could consider it as my curiosity and impatience getting the best of me. :)

Bigguy

Since it was marked RC1 about 20 more bugs were found. It will not be out I would think until they are resolved.

SugarD-x

Quote from: Bigguy on December 24, 2018, 03:29:33 PM
Since it was marked RC1 about 20 more bugs were found. It will not be out I would think until they are resolved.
Where are you getting that information from?

https://github.com/SimpleMachines/SMF2.1/milestone/6

d3vcho

Please avoid sharing that kind of information. A couple of days ago we released what could be the final RC1 build to the beta testers group. Most of the latest bugs on GitHub are related to that build sent to the testers.

Now it's up to the development team to merge now (or not) some of the solutions for those bugs. We don't want to merge them all, but it might be worth to merge some of them for release consistency. Those aren't a release stopper anyway.
"Greeting Death as an old friend, they departed this life as equals"

Bigguy

Sorry about that. What he said.

Arantor

What's to share, though? The code is on Github, one could easily take the point of "the version numbers were changed to RC1" as that point in time and note bugs having been created after that...
No good deed goes unpunished
All helpful urges should be circumvented

d3vcho

Sure, while that's true and available for anyone, Bigguy said that it won't be out until they're resolved, he thinks. That can just be misleading for other users and not entirely true.

Quote from: Bigguy on December 24, 2018, 07:32:55 PM
Sorry about that. What he said.

No problem :)
"Greeting Death as an old friend, they departed this life as equals"

Arantor

Mind you it also exposes some interesting decisions, like the choice to rewrite how board access works this close to an RC, it was stable and mature and now needs to be totally retested.
No good deed goes unpunished
All helpful urges should be circumvented

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