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Author Topic: Keeping track of code changes - best method?  (Read 2030 times)

Offline Looking

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Re: Keeping track of code changes - best method?
« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2019, 05:34:00 AM »
I do the same as GL700Wing and also keep dated backups before major changes.

Offline GL700Wing

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Re: Keeping track of code changes - best method?
« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2019, 06:05:27 AM »
... also keep dated backups before major changes.
Ditto - plus I have a test forum with all the same Sources/Themes files where I stage and test *all* changes before making them on the production forum. 

Offline Gwenwyfar

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Re: Keeping track of code changes - best method?
« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2019, 08:04:55 AM »
Um, why not? A local repository sits on your computer...
And unless you're messing with attachments or avatars, most files are under a hundred kb, when you upload them to the forum server... Not that it even makes any difference compared to downloading backups or uploading packages to the forum... Even a full zip with all files doesn't go over some 5mb.

(Ps: My Internet has roughly the same rates...)
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Offline landyvlad

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Re: Keeping track of code changes - best method?
« Reply #23 on: March 28, 2019, 10:58:39 PM »
OK maybe I misunderstood local repository to mean FULL back up.

Does it just mean ' a copy of files I've changed ' ?
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Offline Aleksi "Lex" Kilpinen

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Re: Keeping track of code changes - best method?
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2019, 12:44:44 AM »
You would probably want a full mirror of your files, but that wouldn't be much to download once.
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Offline Arantor

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Re: Keeping track of code changes - best method?
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2019, 03:40:10 AM »
OK maybe I misunderstood local repository to mean FULL back up.

Does it just mean ' a copy of files I've changed ' ?

No, it means a system designed to track every change made and let you leave yourself notes as to what changed and why.
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Offline landyvlad

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Re: Keeping track of code changes - best method?
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2019, 11:14:00 AM »
and that's what Im getting at - how best to structure such a system ?
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Offline Gwenwyfar

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Re: Keeping track of code changes - best method?
« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2019, 11:16:15 AM »
A local repository is the same as a github repository (or whichever other git repositories out there), except it is only in your computer, and not on the internet.
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Offline shawnb61

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Re: Keeping track of code changes - best method?
« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2019, 11:20:30 AM »
A 'repository' is all of the above.  A source code control system.  Repositories have a copy of the code as well as methods to regulate & track all of the changes.  More traditional source code control systems  (old school...) would have a 'checkout' function, like a library, to make sure folks' changes didn't conflict with each other; only one person was allowed to udpate a file at a time.  More modern source code controls systems (like Git) work at the 'commit' level - specific lines of code changed, "diffs" - which enable different folks to work on the same file concurrently (but have an added layer of complexity as a result for resolving the conflicts that will happen). 

Git is one of the more popular repositories in use today.  Using SMF 2.1 as an example, you have:
 - a copy of all the current source code: 
         https://github.com/SimpleMachines/SMF2.1/tree/release-2.1/Sources
 - a log of changes made: 
         https://github.com/SimpleMachines/SMF2.1/commits/release-2.1
 - with each detailed "commit" having specific changes made with notes as to why: 
         https://github.com/SimpleMachines/SMF2.1/pull/5545/files

Note that with Git, you do not have to use Github.com at all if you don't want to - you can have a local copy on your PC.  OR, you can have a private copy up on Github. 

Git is kinda complex, but extremely powerful.  Worth learning & using, IMO. 
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